Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repository.afs.edu.gr/handle/6000/511
Title: Comparative study of viscosity properties of hemp, pea, soy, and brown rice in water with the addition of NaCl
Authors: Karastergiou, Emmanouil
Supervisors: Zinoviadou, Kyriaki
Subjects LC: Academic theses
Rheology
Food - Composition
Food handling
Food - Biotechnology
Keywords: Soy proteins
Hemp proteins
Pea proteins
Brown rice proteins
Rheological characteristics
Viscosity
Viscoelasticity
Functional properties
Issue Date: 2022
Publisher: Perrotis College
Cardiff Metropolitan University
Abstract: The global food market is seeing a surge in demand for high-nutritional-value items derived from sustainable sources. In this research, the rheological characteristics of soy, hemp, brown rice, pea proteins were studied to indicate the ability and type of formation that can occur when the sample is under specific conditions. Viscosity is the main scope of this study to indicate the functional properties included solubility, emulsifying and foaming properties, gelling ability, and water holding capacity. All samples were prepared and accurately measured in water-based solutions, with the addition of NaCl (salt) that can change the functional properties of the protein solution. Measuring the viscosity in time intervals with heating, to indicate the viscose characteristics of the solution. The identification of viscoelasticity was determined though similar research as the results indicated similar formation characteristics and flow of the viscose solution.
Description: Includes bibliographical references, photos, and illustrations.
MSc in New Food Product and Business Development
Length: 39 pages
Type: Thesis
Publication Status: Not published
URI: http://repository.afs.edu.gr/handle/6000/511
Restrictions: All rights reserved
Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International
Language: en
Appears in Collections:Theses

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